Forum Posts

francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In BEHAVIOURS/ TRAINING
Puppies are like magicians in that they seem to find things they aren't supposed to have, no matter how hard you try- it's like they pull them out of thin air! Read on for tips and tricks to set yourself and your puppy up for success when it comes to trading and preventing resource guarding! Start off on the right foot and you shouldn't have to Gladiator wrestle your dog to the ground Puppies are 100% going to find something they shouldn't, no matter how careful you are. The most important rule is... ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS TRADE UP! When your puppy "finds" something, it becomes very high value, so you need to offer them something that's even more high value. If you take things from your dog, they will begin to see you as a threat to their things. If you always take things away, they're going to start trying to hide from you, or become more aggressive when you try and take it. Dogs have a sense of "fairness" and will learn quickly that this way they get the short end of the deal. INSTEAD, teach your puppy that surrendering things to you is a good thing! You aren't a bully, and you aren't unfair. This way, you won't have to chase your puppy around the house, or wrestle their mouth open They'll learn to bring you things they find (this is a huge safety plus!) And to drop on que. So, when you see your puppy has something in their mouth... Don't freak out! Use a calm, friendly voice, "hey puppy, what did you find? Oh thank you!" Grab a treat **I recommend having easy access to treats in all rooms of the house for the first few months of your puppies life** Walk towards them with the treat, "thank you! You wanna trade?" Keep it upbeat, and trade them the treat for what they have. Always praise and reward when they've dropped what they had They'll learn quickly that trading with you is the better deal! *Yes there might be the time they have something dangerous in their mouth. If there's a situation like this, you might have to pry their mouth open. But trade whenever you can!** Make sure you also set aside training time to work on "leave it" and "drop" So remember those 3 important words, ALWAYS TRADE UP! And no, you won't have to do this their whole life the sooner it becomes a positive association, the sooner they'll drop it when you ask (no bribery needed!)
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In BEHAVIOURS/ TRAINING
Barking, along with whining, howling and growling, is a dog's natural means of communication. A dog may bark for a number of reasons: to induce play, discipline young, warn of danger, threaten intruders, or it may bark because it's curious. It's a natural thing for dogs to do! BUT, how do you make sure you don't let it get out of control? Here's some tips to set your puppy up for success when it comes to using their voice Keep in mind that it's not bad for a dog to bark, but, when you say "quiet" they should be able to stop. Here's some things to try/keep in mind! Watch when/what you give attention. Puppies, like little kids, LOVE attention (even if it's negative!) And they HATE being ignored. If your puppy starts barking too much, turn away from them, or purposely look somewhere else and completely ignore them The moment they're quiet, smile, tell them "thank you, good quiet!" And reward them with your attention, and show affection or go back to playing Reward what you like! Reward your puppy whenever you see ANY behavior you like! Examples of this, would be your puppy lying down calmly, sitting nicely, being quiet, etc if your puppy is making a good choice to lie down quietly, walk by and drop a treat for them telling them they are good. The more they are rewarded for good choices/behavior, the more they are likely to make those choices Interrupt/redirect the behaviour If your puppy starts barking and isn't able to listen to "stop" you can try breaking their attention off of what they are barking at. Try filling a can with some pennies, or blowing a short sound on a whistle, any noise that will get their attention. As soon as they look at you, or stop for any second, reward them! **REMEMBER** it's always best to give your puppy something you can say YES to instead of NO! so redirect to something you can say yes to! Get them to sit, or go to their place, or throw a toy for them Reward the barking Yes I know this one sounds counter productive! BUT, if someone rings the doorbell, thank them for letting you know. Acknowledge that you heard it and that you will take care of it. Let your dog bark, say thank you, give a treat, and then give them the quiet command. Dogs bark to alert us to things, it's a built in job they do (free security system!) So let them know when enough is enough Barking doesn't get them what they want! If they want a treat or a toy and are barking for it, cross your arms and withhold it until they settle down. Sometimes it's best to wait for them to figure out what you're waiting for instead of repeating "quiet" over and over **remember: the more you have to repeat a word, the more it loses effectiveness** but as soon as they stop, reinforce the command with "yes! Good quiet!" If they're barking at you for attention, don't give it to them. If they're barking to get out of the car, don't let them out until they are quiet The more you do this, the faster they learn that barking doesn't get them what they want Barking = removal. If your puppy isn't able to quiet down, remove them. If they can't behave the way you're asking, then they don't get to be with you. You can put your puppy away and say "no, you need to be quiet" If they can be quiet for a few seconds, tell them "good quiet!" And let them out If your puppy goes in the backyard and barks, go out with them on a leash, and as soon as they bark, take them back inside the house. They'll learn the rules real quickly! De-sensitize your puppy to situations that might make them want to bark. For example, the more you ring your doorbell and make it a normal noise, the less likely they are to be bothered by it. The more you practice walking to and opening the front door, the less that will alert them. Practice watching out of the window, and reward them everytime they see something outside (like a neighbor, another dog, mailman, etc) every time saying "good quiet!" The more you can teach them to be quiet, the less likely it is to become a problem Make sure your dog has energy releases! Puppies and dogs can bark because they have too much energy built up. For example, a dog that doesn't get enough exercise is alot more likely to bark than one that gets enough mental and physical exercise **Remember that barking can also be a fear response, especially if they're in the age where they are going through a fear period. In this case, don't "punish" the barking, this can just create more of a negative response** And lastly, some dogs just like to bark more than others!! Some dogs might bark a few times in their life, while others are vocal and very communicative! Barking is a natural thing for your dog to do, and it can be something that "fills their bucket" (makes them happy to be a dog) So find places where it's appropriate let them bark while they're excited to chase a ball at the park, or when they're excited to see their friend Set your puppy up for success by teaching them rules, boundaries and limitations. Follow these steps and you should have a fluffy friend that knows when to use their indoor/outdoor voice
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In GROOMING
Here's the answers to some of our frequently asked questions about puppies "My puppy get hiccups after eating, is this normal?" YES! It's common for puppies to have hiccups puppies can get hiccups after eating or drinking too quickly, or when they're overexcited. They'll go away on their own "Why does my puppy shake and twitch ALOT while sleeping?" They are dreaming! Puppies can look quite spastic while they're in the middle of an exciting dream! You might even hear them give a few sleep barks "How much should my puppy sleep?" Expect your new puppy to sleep a lot during this stage. Most puppies will sleep about 18 to 20 hours a day to support their fast-growing brains and bodies. Puppies from 8 to 12 weeks old may seem to go from zero to 60 out of nowhere, then suddenly pass out to nap within minutes of being in overdrive! "How much exercise does my puppy need?" The general rule, is 5-10 minutes of exercise per age x 2 a day. So, for example, a 2 month old puppy, could be outside 10-20 minutes twice a day *Be sure to check out our article on the dangers of over exercising your puppy* "My puppy's heartbeat seems fast, is this ok?" Yes! Puppy's have a higher/faster heart rate than grown dogs "My puppy doesn't seem interested in food in the morning" That's ok! Your puppy can go through stages of increased appetite, and some dogs actually prefer to eat in the evening. Dogs aren't like us, and don't always look for breakfast in the morning Have another question you'd like answered? Drop it in the comments and we'll get back to you!
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In GROOMING
WHATS THE DEAL WITH PET INSURANCE? Is it worth it? Remember that our puppies come with 30 days of coverage from Trupanion, Canada's#1 pet insurance company! But what about after that? Should you continue to have insurance for your doodle? When it comes to insurance, there are 3 options 1) Open a separate bank account where you put some money aside and then add every month. Keep this account for dog medical expenses if you need it, it's there, and if you don't end up needing it, then you haven't lost any money 2) Purchase an insurance plan for your doodle. The whole point of insurance is for peace of mind for accidents and the unforeseeable. So you might not think you'll use it, but it's there when you need it! Shop around and find a company and plan you're comfortable with Another pro of adding an insurance plan at a young age while your doodle is healthy, is that they have no pre existing conditions (which aren't covered when you purchase) -You can choose between an "accident and illness" plan and an "accidents" plan 3) If you can comfortably afford to spend an unexpected few thousand dollars a year on any accidents, then you can probably get away without any insurance or savings. Just remember vet bills add up quickly! (The average cost of an emergency vet visit is between $800-$1500! And if you need anesthesia the price can jump into the thousands!) *My own personal experience: Bandit is super healthy and has only been sick once, something in the environment made him sick (never found out what it was) but after a vet hospital visit, fluids and medications, it was over $600 -Bandit was attacked by an off leash dog, ended up with puncture wounds in his neck and his side ripped open 3 inches, had to have them drained, flushed and surgery to sew up, and it was over $1300* So ultimately, the choice is yours to make there are pros and cons to all of the choices, so decide what works best for you, your doodle, and your finances *BONUS TIP* if you're a Costco member you can get a good deal with Pets Plus Us! (This is what I personally use) I know this is available in Canada but can't guarantee other countries availability
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In HEALTH AND NUTRITION
Just like us, our dogs can benefit from fruits, veggies and other healthy foods! Fruits and veggies offer lots of good healthy vitamins and minerals and can be had as snacks or added as supplements Offer your doodle some cooked meats for a tasty and beneficial treat, or as a dinner topper
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In BEHAVIOURS/ TRAINING
HOW TO SAFELY SOCIALIZE YOUR PUPPY *Especially during a pandemic* We've established that your puppy doesn't have sufficient immunity against parvovirus and other life threatening illnesses until 16 weeks. So what can you do before then? There's lots of ways to safely socialize your puppy before 16 weeks and it's SUPER IMPORTANT that you do! Puppies will go through a "fear period" around 12-13 weeks. So you want to make sure to give them lots of positive experiences and interactions before then, so they go into this stage with a good foundation of confidence It's recommended you try and have your puppy meet 100 new people before they're 12-13 weeks. But, in a world where were encouraged to social distance, this isn't so easy to achieve. If you need to be careful about social distancing, take advantage of outdoor spaces! Have friends, family members and neighbors come for a visit in your backyard. Ask if you can come to your neighbours backyard for a visit. Backyards are a great way to get together! Any home that has a back yard without another dog that lives there is a great safe space. See if friends and family are willing to meet for an outdoor BBQ. Grab some lawn chairs and sit in your driveway with a friend Go for car rides and park by a soccer game, or pass by a school when kids are walking home. Have friends and family go for walks with you (even if it's just up and down the sidewalk) Have a friend hold your puppy for a short car ride! Meet up in a parking lot with your lawn chairs for a visit See if you have friends or family who would be willing to "puppy sit" and come watch or have puppy over to their place for a little while. Chem and see if there's any dog friendly restaurants near you. Sitting out on a restaurant patio is a great way to be around people Pet stores also allow you to bring your puppy in (usually the rule is they can come in but will need carried if they're not done their shots) So take your puppy in to say hello to the cashiers and staff and other customers Take your puppy to the vet's office! Again, you'll want to carry them to keep them safe. Let them say hi to the staff and vets. It's great practice for getting them used to the vet office, and can make it a positive experience before they go for a real appointment. Bring some treats, and have a seat in a chair with puppy on your lap and people watch. Grab a park bench, and have your puppy practice calm while people watching Also check your local areas to see what other stores allow pets inside! You might be surprised at how many you find! (For example, Cabela's, Bass Pro, Home Depot, Home sense, and many others!) Stores are still following social distancing protocols, so this is a great way to be in public and around people while staying safe You'll also want to walk your puppy before 16 weeks, but stay away from dog parks, or areas that have high dog populations. Stick to sidewalks and paved paths, and don't let your puppy say hi to other dogs yet. You can carry treats and have strangers toss some to your puppy *You can start having playdates after their second set of shots* which is usually around 12 weeks. BUT, make sure you know the dog you will be introducing your puppy to. You'll want to know their health and vaccinations history. Also, control the settings, so have the playdate in your own backyard it might sound funny, but ask your friend if they're willing to wash their dogs paws before they come over. A healthy dog can still be carrying harmful bacteria on their paws that won't bother them because they're immune, but could make your puppy sick. Just like a little kid would wash their hands before meeting a new baby There's also so many free resources, and online classes you can do to start building your dogs confidence right from your very own home Just because your puppy isn't fully vaccinated yet, doesn't mean you want to keep them locked away from the world. Be safe and smart about where you take them and you'll keep your puppy safe and healthy and set them up for success!
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In BEHAVIOURS/ TRAINING
WHEN CAN I START TAKING MY PUPPY out in public and around other dogs This is a common question. People want to know when they are able to start taking their puppy out on adventures! Puppies, will typically receive their last set of vaccinations around 16 weeks. It's after this set, that you are safe to start exploring more. It's important to know, that before this last set of vaccinations, your pup does NOT have sufficient immunity to life threatening illnesses such as parvovirus. Parvovirus is a highly contagious life threatening, viral disease that can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog's feces. It's also transmittable through shedding, and can live in the ground for 7 years!! So it's important to make sure your pup is fully vaccinated before you take them out in public areas This includes not taking your puppy to any class, daycare or groomers before 16 weeks *Check out our "how to socialize my puppy safely" article for ideas on how to safely socialize your puppy to new places, people, and dogs*
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In GROOMING
Did you know that there's risks when you remove a puppy from its litter too early? This is why, our puppies aren't ready to go home until at least 8 weeks We know it's SO hard to wait for pick up day! When you finally get to bring your puppy home! But, waiting, is the best thing we can do for you and your puppy! So what's the risk of removing a puppy too early Puppies who are taken too early (before 8 weeks) don't get the chance to fully develop socialization skills, and are more likely to have behavioural issues such as anxiety, aggression, biting, destructive behavior, and barking "Puppies learn a variety of fundamental life lessons as they grow up along with their mother and litter-mates. Between the age of three and six weeks, puppies learn important behavioral patterns specific to dogs. For instance, through play they learn about different body postures and follow the lines of canine communication. Between five to seven weeks, puppies also learn how to inhibit their bite when playing, a very important life lesson which will affect the puppy's future behavior. Puppies learn bite inhibition through play. When a puppy bites too hard, the other puppy will likely make an acute yelp, followed by withdrawal from play. The biting puppy therefore learns that in order for play to continue, he must watch how much pressure he uses to bite. Failure to learn appropriate bite inhibition, will therefore result in a puppy who does not measure its bite. This means that it will likely hurt another dog even if playing, and most of all, will definitely hurt a human's sensitive skin if the owner does not take measures to teach the puppy bite inhibition. Puppies also learn from the age of five weeks how to be submissive. The mother dog teaches the puppy basic manners and she may discipline unacceptable behaviors by growling, snarling or snapping lightly. The puppies after a few corrections learn more acceptable behaviors, and afterwards, all it takes is the mother to give a mere glare to get a point across. When puppies fail to learn discipline from their mother, they tend to become very difficult to train" "Puppies removed from the litter too early are prone to be nervous with a tendency to bark and bite. They are also less likely to accept discipline and may also be aggressive to other dogs. In her own words, ''Generally speaking, a puppy take away from its mother and litter mates before seven weeks of age, may not realize its full potential as a dog and a companion. To maximize the mental and psychological development of puppies, they must remain in the nest with their mother and litter mates" "Puppies removed too early may also have a hard time tolerating frustration. Because they never had to struggle over resources such as mom's nipples, they aren't much used to not getting what they want and can't self-soothe" So, even though it's hard, it's worth the wait! And you'll have a whole lifetime together Sources: https://pethelpful.com/.../Risks-of-Removing-Puppies-too....
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In GROOMING
SAFETY TIP As we head further into fall, the days will become shorter, making it darker earlier. Remember to make safety for yourself, and your doodle your first priority! It's harder for cars to see you in the dark, so stay off the road, stick to sidewalks and designated walking paths, and dress in bright colors or wear a reflective vest (you can pick one up at your local Walmart!) And don't forget about your dog too! It's especially a good idea if you live in Canada where we have long, dark winters. Be sure to pick up a reflective dog vest, a glow in the dark collar, and a flashing light you can hang from their collar! STAY SAFE, STAY SEEN!
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In GROOMING
PUPPY CHECKLIST One of the most common questions people have when preparing for their puppy's arrival is "what do I need to have for my puppy to come home?" Here's what we recommend dog bowl and water dish Dog food Crate/kennel Pen (optional) Baby gates (again, optional, but helpful) Age appropriate toys! Age appropriate teething items Dog safe cleaning products for accidents A clicker (highly recommend clicker training!) Potty bells! (For housetraining) Brush so they can get used to being brushed and groomed Treats for training (Zukes are a popular choice!) *Also for low calorie, healthy treats, try Cheerios!* Remove carpets if you're able (this helps make house training cleanup easier ) Puppy leash (remember your puppy comes home with their first custom, locally made, beautiful collar! ) Have a vet picked out and their first appointment made These are some of the essentials we'd recommend to help you successfully transition your puppy to their forever home What did we miss? Have any other items you'd add to the list? Feel free to drop your ideas in the comments below
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In BEHAVIOURS/ TRAINING
There is nothing in the whole world like the unconditional love of a doodle! But what about when they start to love you *ahem* too much? This is an important topic to address, as there's still alot of misinformation about humping behaviours. The most common answers you might hear is that it's a display of sexual behaviour, or that your puppy is trying to assert dominance over you. This is NOT true and it's also not gender specific! It's not just boy puppies that can display this behaviour, girls definitely can as well! The most common reasons puppies hump, are that they are overtired, over excited, and over stimulated. First of all, don't make a big deal out of it. Instead, interrupt and redirect the behaviour. *Remember* it's easier to give your puppy something you can say yes! to, instead of just saying no! So, try and get your puppy to sit, play with a toy, or at least keep all 4 paws on the ground. Then praise them when they do! And know that it's likely they need some quiet time or a nap. Just like human little kids, puppies can get overtired and crazy, and not know that they need a timeout. So take that as your cue that your puppy needs a nap, or that the activity is too exciting and that they need a chance to calm down. You might hear the comment "oh it's natural, it doesn't do any harm, just let them do it" or find that people think it's funny. BUT, it's not going to be so funny if they start trying to do it to other people's belongings, other animals or to humans! Humping, is NOT an appropriate social behavior in dog language, and it could lead to some serious problems with dog interactions. It's your job to teach your puppy boundaries and appropriate social behaviors You don't want a dog that grows up thinking it's ok to hump when they're tired, frustrated, or even just trying to play. So remember, interrupt, redirect, and praise. And then enforce some quiet time. This will help them settle, and save you some sanity Stay diligent about this training and you'll have a well behaved dog who respects people's and other dogs space
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In HEALTH AND NUTRITION
First of all, I'll start by reminding everyone there are SO many different opinions on the topic of raw dog food, many people for it, and many people against it. With so many different opinions and arguments, how do you make the decision if it's right for you? *The purpose of this article is for educational purposes, to provide facts, and share our view on the subject. Remember, always feel free to do your own research and discuss options with your vet* The most obvious flaw with raw, is that it's, well... RAW. Dogs, are NOT immune to the dangers of raw meat, and the harmful bacteria it may contain and can get sick from bacteria such as Salmonella, Listeria, Campylobacter, and E. Coli even if your dog doesn't become sick, they become a carrier and can pass this harmful bacteria on to you! What's even more troubling is that a 2011 study in The Canadian Veterinary Journal found that much of the Salmonella found in dogs fed raw meat diets was a type that's resistant to antibiotic drugs It also isn't as simple as making the decision to feed raw to your dog, either. You have to learn how to properly balance and supplement your dogs food. An improperly balanced diet and nutritional deficiencies can create more health problems for your dog. There's also the risk of cross contamination when you are preparing the food, as well as the fact that raw food can't be used for free feeding and spoils quicker. BIGGEST RISKS OF RAW Raw bones can cause chipped/broken teeth, cuts in the mouth, puncture gums, be a choking Hazzard, cause perforations and/or obstruction of the esophagus and intestines causing life threatening GI blockages! Lastly, not all dogs do well on raw!! One of the arguments in favor of, is that dogs are descendant of wolves, and wolves are carnivores. "The problem with this assumption is that dogs are genetically different from wolves, says Science Magazine. Dogs split off from wolves and became domesticated thousands of years ago. Since then, they have evolved alongside humans to be able to eat much of what humans eat. In a study published in Nature, genetic researchers found clear evidence that dogs have genetically adapted to eat a diet consisting of meats and starches. Feeding your dog nothing but raw meat as though he's a tame wolf has the potential to deprive him of vitamins and nutrients that are vital to his health" Some dogs experience issues such as GI upset, diarrhea, and vomiting on raw diets For these reasons, we (and many others, including veterinary societies) don't recommend raw feeding You can still get all the benefits of real foods, without the risk of anything raw, by doing home cooked meals for your dog! Sources: https://www.hillspet.com/.../dangers-of-raw-diets-for-dogs
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In BEHAVIOURS/ TRAINING
KENNEL TRAINING We believe that kennel training is an essential life skill for your dog to have! There will come a day that your dog will have to spend some time in a kennel, whether that be at the groomers, the vet's, at a boarding facility, for travel, after a vet procure or injury, or in an emergency. Not to mention the fact that kennels are the SAFEST way to leave your puppy unattended **I also feel it's important to mention here that while, yes doodles CAN be kennel trained, they are not a great kennel dog, meaning that if you work Monday-Friday, 9-5 and need to leave your dog in a kennel during that time, a doodle is not the right fit for you. Doodles are an active mix who need alot of attention, affection and time** So, how should you kennel train One of the biggest mistakes people make while kennel/crate training is go straight to putting their puppy inside. Remember, the whole point to this training is to create a calm, comfortable, atmosphere, and make the crate a safe, enjoyable space to be in. To start, introduce the crate. Let your puppy see it, smell it, and interact with it. For the first introductions, don't force your puppy inside, or close the door. Keep it open, and let them explore. To help make the kennel a good place to be, you can throw treats in for them to go get, and can even feed meals inside of it (again, keep the door open) To help make an even bigger positive association with the kennel, you can up the reward! For example, most puppies LOVE bully sticks ( fair warning, they are STINKY ) so, give them a bully stick, or another high value treat, while they are in the kennel. Keep the door open, but if they try and come out with their treat, take it away and put it back in the kennel. They'll soon learn that they get the reward only if they stay in the kennel. Once your puppy is comfortable spending time in there, you can practice closing the door. Make sure they have their bully stick, or other treat, and sit on the floor by their kennel where they can see you. You don't have to lock the door into place, but practice shutting the door for a minute, and then opening it back up. Open and close it a few times to help them get used to it. If they do well with that, you can start closing the door all the way, and building up the time you leave them. To start, only do a few minutes at a time! You always want to keep training short, positive, and end on a high note It's important to let them out of the kennel while they are still in a calm state. If you open the door while they are crying or barking, they can learn that's how they get let out. The more practice you do, the quicker your doodle will settle into their space. Make a point of setting some time aside for training, and be patient during the process Each time try and move a little farther away, and leave the door closed a little longer. Once your pup is more comfortable, you can even practice walking away out of sight for a few seconds, and then coming back. The next step in training is to leave them for short periods of time. Gradually build up 2 minutes, and then 5, 10, etc. Always try and make sure your puppy has had some exercise, the chance to potty, and has a safe activity to work on while they're in the kennel (such as a stuffed frozen Kong) REMEMBER: Don't leave your puppy unsupervised with a toy or a treat as they have the potential to be a chocking hazard Some other tips you can try! -Covering the crate with a blanket -Playing white noise or music/tv in the background *These tips are especially helpful if you're kennelling your puppy overnight* FOR OVERNIGHT CRATE TRAINING Waiting until your puppy is sleeping/really tired before you put them in the kennel, can really help make the transition easier. If you are able, let your puppy fall asleep before you put them in their kennel. Also, you'll ideally want to put the crate beside your bed (or as close to you as possible) If your puppy cries, you can talk to them, and put your hand in, but don't let them out. Like human babies, they can learn that crying = getting taken out. And just like human babies, it can be stressful to be separated from you. Up until now, they've never slept alone and are used to being surrounded by their littermates. So you want to teach them that they have not been abandoned, they aren't alone, and that it's ok Use a calm quiet voice, and give them gentle soothing touches. I know it can be hard to listen to, but they will be ok and it doesn't last forever Tip: for free white noise, check out YouTube! There are lots of 8-10 hour videos of white noise you can play for the night
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In BEHAVIOURS/ TRAINING
Socialization is CRUCIAL for your pup to help them become a well balanced, friendly, confident, happy dog We do all we can with your puppy while they are here with us, but it's important you carry on the important work of socializing and desensitizing when you bring your pup home When people think of socializing their puppy, they tend to think of some of the bigger ideas like meeting people and introducing them to other dogs. And YES these are super important! BUT, there's alot more to it than just setting up playdates. For example, have you ever thought about all the different surfaces there are for your doodle to walk on? We don't tend to think of the small details like that, but it's important to expose your puppy to all different kinds of surfaces! Sidewalks, grass, turf, hardwood, carpet, gravel, linoleum, wood, tile, cement, roads, etc. The last thing you want is a dog that's afraid to walk on hardwood floors (which believe it or not, happens!) What about noises? Have you ever stopped to think about the thousands of noises we hear each day!? A running dishwasher, heat coming through the vents, tv, pots and pans clanging, people running up and down stairs, the neighborhood noise through the window... It's alot when you stop to think about it! The more you can introduce your puppy to sights, sounds, smells, textures, and energies, the better For example, a quiet afternoon in the house is alot different than a kids soccer game, or walking downtown, and you'd like for your puppy to be able to listen and behave well in all of those situations. Using positive introductions helps your puppy stay confident and happy as they grow An important piece of positive introductions, is that you make the experience fun, safe, and use lots of engagement so your pup learns to listen no matter what. Yes, letting your puppy play with other dogs is great, BUT can they come back to you when called? Can they still listen to you, pay attention to you? Can they meet people, and still be able to follow the rules- sit to say hello, pay attention to you? Just like human children, puppies need to learn their rules, boundaries, and limitations. For example, it's up to you to create positive first experiences, introductions and rules such as: "there's a bike, it's ok, it's not scary, and we give it space and don't chase it or bark at it." Or, "There's a dog over there, but we're not going that way, so you need to be able to stay with me" Or most importantly, "Yes I'm letting you off leash, but that doesn't mean you run away" Keep in mind, that developmentally, your puppy will hit their second stage fear around 12/13 weeks. So, before then is your big window of opportunity! You should aim to have your puppy meet 100 different people before then, and should try and expose them to 5-10 different sounds/smells/ experiences a day! So wear high heels and loud shoes, wear a hat that covers your face, and sunglasses. Let them experience a hairdryer and the noise of a blender running. Ring the doorbell lots so it becomes just another noise! It's a big world full of adventure and exploring out there! But make sure that no matter where you are, you stay the center of their world
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In HEALTH AND NUTRITION
FREE FEEDING Free feeding is making sure your dog has access to food and water at all times, vs having scheduled meals where food is offered There are certain dog breeds that don't do well with free feeding, as they don't self regulate well and will eat themselves sick. Doodles, however, are very good at not over eating. It's important your puppy gets enough to eat, especially when they are going through growth spurts and needs the calories and nutrition. PRO'S -Pets can eat as much as they need; they are never left feeling famished between meals. -They never have to miss a meal if you’re running late; you don’t have to worry if you can’t get home right at feeding time. -There are less food-guarding issues - because they always have access to food and don’t have to worry about when their next meal is coming, it takes the value away from the food. -Good for active pets (or pets that have varied levels of activity) because if your pet needs to eat more calories on a certain day to account for extra calories burned, they can For these reasons, we recommend you try free feeding your puppy our dogs tend to do very well with this, and you're never worried about "how much should I be feeding?"
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In BEHAVIOURS/ TRAINING
PUPPY ATTACK! Ok, not really, but those tiny little puppy teeth are like sharp little shark teeth! Take a look through our teething/biting article to save your sanity and set both yourself and your puppy up for success Sure they look like angelic cute balls of fluff, but there will come a time where you wonder if you've ended up with a Sharkadoodle First, know that mouthing and biting, and chewing are all TOTALLY normal behaviors for a puppy. It's natural for a pup to chew, BUT you need to make sure right away that you set boundaries about what's ok to chew, and what's not- like you or the kitchen table! Remember, your puppy is a baby, and just like human babies, they will need to teethe and will be uncomfortable while they go through the stages of baby teeth coming in, losing them, and their adult canines coming through. So knowing that your pup need to chew, make sure you have appropriate items for them to chew on, such as teething rings, tendons, and chew toys. You can also soak a Terry cloth in chicken broth and put it in the freezer for them to mouth on (this feels good on their gums) as well as make them a special smoothie or doggy ice cream! I'll include some links below Puppies, when they play with eachother, use their mouths and their teeth. Through doing this, they learn BITE INHIBITION (learning exactly how much pressure to use with their mouth to make sure they don't hurt their playmate) When you play with your puppy, MAKE SURE YOU PLAY WITH A TOY. Don't wrestle or use your hands, as this can encourage them that hands = play things. It's ok later to play with them that way when they've learned the rules and to be gentle, but the first thing you want to teach is good manners, and that hands aren't for chewing Make sure you're in control of the game. It's important for puppies to practice high levels of excitement, while still being able to listen and settle. So try making your puppy "sit" or "wait" before you throw their ball or start up with the toy again. This also helps you gage your puppies energy level- are they able to listen? Are they getting overtired/over stimulated and getting too rough? Is it time for a break? If your puppy bites you, make an angry high pitched yelp (like a fellow puppy would if they were bit too hard) tell them "no biting" or "gentle" and redirect by putting something they CAN chew like a toy or a treat in their mouth. Stop the game and see if you can get them to settle down. If they can, continue playing. If not, walk away. Make sure you have an escape, so you have a way to walk away without your puppy following you. Puppies LOVE attention, whether it's positive or negative. They'd even rather be in trouble and have your attention, than no attention at all. So if you walk away, your puppy will quickly learn that biting= end of fun and being left alone. If you do need to walk away, only leave their view for a little while (10-20 seconds) then walk in and try again to play. If they make contact with their teeth, the game has to stop again. Make sure that you stay calm. If you push your puppy away, or start swatting your hands or yelling, your puppy interprets that as excitement and will be more likely to keep chomping. Keep in mind that puppies, just like little kids, get overtired and don't always know when they've had enough and need some quiet time or a nap. If you know your puppy has eaten, had a drink, pottied and had some playtime and they're starting to get extra chompy and wound up, they need some quiet time to have a sleep. So remember, always tell them "no biting" or "gentle" and redirect to a toy or treat. Practice starting/stopping the game. Walk away if you both need a break, and know when to give them some quiet time Puppy biting doesn't last forever! And the more diligent you are about creating rules, redirecting, and following through, the sooner you'll have a puppy that keeps their mouth to themselves Links for frozen puppy treats https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/ice-cream-dogs/
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In HEALTH AND NUTRITION
Who doesn't love spoiling their puppy!? Your goodest boy or girl deserves ALL the treats But with SO many options, how do you know what's good, or what to avoid? Here's some products we recommend you stay far away from, and some how to's on choosing good treats for your puppy SAY NO TO RAWHIDE What are the most common risks with rawhide? - Contamination: rawhide chews contain trace amounts of toxic chemicals did you know rawhide goes through more bleaching processes and is soaked in more chemicals than shoe leather!? It's even less digestible! - Illness: there's also the risk of contaminants such as E-Coli and Salmonella, which can make both you and your dog sick! - Digestive Irritation: rawhides frequently cause stomach upset including diarrhea (rawhide doesn't really break down and is hard to digest) Did you know rawhide isn't considered a food product!? And the biggest dangers CHOCKING AND INTESTINAL BLOCKAGES! Rawhide swells up in size once it's been swallowed. This means it can become too large to go past the esophagus, get stuck in their throat, and block their windpipe, leading to choking to death. If your dog does manage to swallow rawhide, it can swell up and cause intestinal blockages which, if not caught early enough, can lead to death. With SO many safer, healthier alternatives, there's NO reason to buy rawhides for your dog! AVOID PIG PRODUCTS Pig products, especially pig ears, have been recalled MANY times due to Salmonella Pig products usually give dogs diarrhea and stomach upset as well OUT OF COUNTRY TREATS Only ever buy treats that are made in Canada or the USA. Make sure to read the package and check the products origin. Treats that are made in other countries such as China, are not safe for consumption. There have been numerous recalls and dog deaths from dangerous out of country treats So how do you pick a safe, healthy and yummy treat for your puppy? We recommend visiting your local pet store! Talk to the staff, they'll be able to tell you what their own dogs favorite is, and what the stores view is on things like rawhide (which they shouldn't sell!) They'll also be able to direct you towards treats that are appropriate for your puppy or dogs age and stage of life Remember, only buy a few treats at a time as getting one of everything for your dog can make them sick. It's possible they might also have an allergy to something, so try one product at a time (like chicken before fish) And ALWAYS supervise your pet when they are having a treat or a chew
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In BEHAVIOURS/ TRAINING
This is probably one of the biggest things people worry about when bringing their new puppy home. So, to help you prepare, take a read through our house training tips and tricks First of all, remember that they are babies, and that accidents will happen- it's part of the process. Be patient, and remember it doesn't last forever. Stay consistent, and the faster you'll see results *Keep in mind that puppies don't make a solid brain/bladder connection until 16 weeks* Generally speaking, puppies can hold their bladder one hour, for every month of age. So a 2 month old puppy, can hold their bladder for 2 hours. BUT, you should be taking them out more often than that, as this reduces the likelihood of accidents. Puppies should be taken out frequently, ideally every 1-2 hours to start. You'll also want to make sure to take them out as soon as they wake up from a nap, during or after playing, and 30 minutes after eating or drinking. *We also recommend that you pick up food and water a few hours before bedtime, as this will help them go through the night without having accidents* if you've picked up their water, and they're looking for a drink, go ahead and give them some water. This just helps you know at what time and how much water they had We also strongly recommend NOT using pee pads as they are counter productive, and confusing to puppies. It's hard to transition to outside when they've been taught and praised for going inside of the house How to set your puppy, and yourself up for success! Puppies should not be given the run of the house, instead start with a small enclosed area (whether that's a pen or an enclosed room, or just an area that's blocked off) This will help your puppy stay not only out of trouble, and safe, but will help you keep an eye on them and reduce the chance of accidents. You can also try the "tether" method and keep them on a leash attached to you. When you take them outside, try taking them to the same spot so they learn that's where they are supposed to do their business. Also add a phrase to it, like "go pee" or "go potty" (But don't keep repeating it, if you keep saying it and nothing is happening, it will lose its meaning) say it one or two times and then wait. You can also say it while they are going to the bathroom, and when they've finished, "good go pee!" Always be SUPER excited when they potty outside and give lots of praise and high rewards make sure to give the treat immediately after they've gone, don't wait until you get back in the house (they won't remember what they're getting the treat for) If you know it's been a while since they've gone, and they need to go, take outside and tell them to go potty, but only give them a few minutes. If they don't go, take them back inside and put them back in a contained area (like their pen or kennel) wait a few minutes, and then take them back outside and tell them to go. Give them a few minutes, and if they don't go, take them back in. Repeat until they go Once they've gone, it's ok to give them some more freedom and let them roam around the house a little more ALSO, remember that when you're outside, you're house training. Don't play with them, or distract them with toys or anything else. When you take them out to pee, they need to pee first. If you go outside to play, and then they pee, they won't make the connection of why they went outside Remember, mistakes will happen. If you catch your puppy starting to go in the house, clap your hands, or make a startling noise (don't scare them though) like loudly saying "no! Outside!" And immediately pick them up and take them outside (even if they've finished going) still put them on the ground and tell them to go pee. If you find an accident in the house, don't punish your puppy for it. Just stay calm and clean it up. Punishing or scaring your puppy only does harm to your relationship and can make them too scared to go to the bathroom in front of you. Clean the soiled area thoroughly. Puppies are highly motivated to continue pottying in areas that smell like urine or feces. Be sure to use a puppy safe cleaner that deodorizes (properly eliminates the smell, so they won't have an accident there again) If possible, pick up carpets until your puppy is house trained. If your puppy has an accident on a bed or a blanket, clean it and take it away as it can become a pattern House-training your puppy requires patience, commitment and lots of consistency, but follow these guidelines and you'll be well on your way to successful house training!
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In GROOMING
GROOMING WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW about nail care! Nail care, though it might seem like a small detail, is important to your dogs health! Overgrown nails can change the way your dog carries their weight on their feet. This can lead to splayed feet, reduced traction, and even cause deformed feet and injure the tendons over time. Make sure to keep your doodles nails trimmed the longer you let them grow, the longer the "quick" grows. This is the part that bleeds if you cut it! Start desensitizing your puppy right away to having their feet/toes/nails handled. Even if you decide to have a groomer do it, they will be thankful you set your puppy up for a positive experience! You can do nail trims at home as well, here's some tips, tricks and explanation of how to first introduce your dog to nail clippers Day 1: Let your puppy sniff the nail clipper or grinder. Give a treat and praise. Day 2: Touch the nail clipper or grinder lightly to each paw. Give a treat and praise. Day 3: Touch the nail clipper to each paw and squeeze the clipper so the puppy hears the sound, or turn the grinder on and let the puppy feel the vibration. Don’t actually trim a nail. Give a treat and praise. Day 4: Touch the nail clipper or grinder to your puppy’s feet again. Give a treat and praise. Day 5: Try trimming off just the very tiniest tip from one front paw nail. Only do one nail. Offer lots of happy praise and a treat if your puppy lets you. Even if he lets you, just do one. Repeat every day until he lets you do this and doesn’t seem to mind. Day 6: Try trimming just the tip off of just two nails. Day 7: Keep working your way up, trimming additional nails each day, until you’ve got them all and your puppy doesn’t mind. Practice even when you don’t need to clip a nail. Even pretending you are clipping and going through the motions help your pup get used to the whole process Check out this YouTube video to see a vet give more information on cutting your dogs nails Video link: https://youtu.be/xtgRqiVek9k
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francescapupperdoo
Mar 22, 2021
In GROOMING
GROOMING WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW about dental hygiene and oral care Did you know that 80% of dogs show signs of oral disease by 3 years old? It's your job to help take care of your puppies pearly whites dental health is a huge part of having a healthy dog. Poor dental hygiene can lead to serious issues that affect the whole body! For example, did you know that oral issues can spread systemically? Bad dental health can lead to issues with the heart valves, liver, and kidneys! "What Does a Healthy Mouth Look Like? Before you learn how to take care of your dog's teeth (and what can happen if you don't), you need to understand what a healthy mouth looks like in the first place. Healthy dog teeth should be clean and free of plaque and tartar (hard, scaly or sticky discolorations). Similarly, your dog's 42 teeth (a third more than you have, as Pet Health Network® points out) should be intact and not jagged or broken. Your furry friend's tongue should be moist — without any signs of lumps or cuts. And, in most cases, his gums should be salmon pink. Some dog breeds naturally have black or black-and-pink gums, notes PetHelpful, which can making looking for the usual signs of discoloration tricky. Make sure you know what your pet's mouth usually looks like, and talk to your vet if you spot any lumps, raised spots, pale gums or bright red tissue. How to Keep Your Dog's Mouth Clean Dogs aren't born with healthy mouths that will stay that way into adulthood — it's up to us to help them keep their pearly whites in tip-top shape. Regular brushing with a dog-specific toothbrush and toothpaste helps, and so do certain toys and treats that are formulated to reduce bacteria in your pet's mouth. Just as you brush your own teeth a few times a day, a dog's mouth also needs daily attention. If brushing your dog's teeth is new to the both of you, be sure to take baby steps. As the American Kennel Club (AKC) notes, you'll want to get your dog comfortable with you touching his mouth and teeth first before you come at him with a toothbrush and toothpaste. First, touch his muzzle and practice rubbing your finger along his teeth and gums. Once he can handle this — while staying calm and relaxed — introduce the toothbrush. Let him smell it, and very gently rub it on his teeth. This process may take a few days for each step. Go slowly, and don't rush your pet. After all, you don't want him to develop anxious or negative feelings about this routine. Once you've developed the trust needed for successful brushing, it's time to work on technique. First, lift your dog's lips and brush his front teeth. Slowly work your way to the back of his mouth, paying careful attention to the outside of his teeth. You may need to pull back at first and only do a few teeth at a time. Once you're both used to the process, you'll find the routine quick and simple to complete. Dog toothpaste is also specially formulated to be as tasty as possible, as long as you like turkey and chicken better than minty freshness. Look for a dog-specific paste at your local pet supply store or vet's office." Remember: You should never use human toothpaste on your dog, since the ingredients can irritate his stomach and make him extremely sick Check out this YouTube video for further instructions on how to properly brush and care for your dogs teeth Video: https://youtu.be/PsNlLLSBWLU Other things you can do to help maintain a healthy mouth: Let your dog chew! Chewing is a natural way for your dog to clean their teeth check with your local pet store for appropriate options! Dental treats! You can give your dog dental treats such as Greenies or denta-sticks to help support clean teeth Dental toys! There are toys that are specifically designed with little grooves so that when you're dog chews on them, they are actually brushing their teeth! Sources: https://www.hillspet.com/.../dog-oral-care-and-brushing....
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